Search

writingthedreamblog

The Fantastic and Mundane Chronicles of an Aspiring Writer

7 Things I Loved About the Wonder Woman Movie

Hello once again, everyone! I’m sorry I haven’t posted in so long, but life’s been a little crazy. During the hiatus, however, I actually started TWO NEW MANUSCRIPTS! Right now both of these stories are centered around strong heroines, so for my first post back, I chose to discuss a film that did the same: Wonder Woman!


1. Themyscira & the Amazons

From the moment my eyes fell on the beautiful green island surrounded by a turquoise ocean, I was entranced. Every scene and detail of this paradise and its fierce inhabitants was breathtaking. I also loved how the first part of the movie set in Themyscira wasn’t rushed so that the audience was able to gain a full sense of the Amazons’ culture and traditions while still wanting to learn more.

2. Gal Gadot 

This breakout actress was truly remarkable. Not only did she portray Diana’s bravery and strength wonderfully, but she also brought out the character’s vulnerabilities and compassion in a way that was touching and real.

3. Chris Pine 

I really enjoyed Chris Pine’s portrayal of Steve Trevor, though several times I couldn’t help but get a decidedly Captain Kirk vibe (not that I’m complaining though!). Despite being Diana’s love interest, Pine managed to present Trevor in heroic but relatable way. Unlike Diana, Trevor isn’t gifted with unearthly strength or a destiny to defeat a vengeful god. He is only human, and yet by the end of the film, it is his acceptance of his own limitations that ultimately empowers him.

4. The Romance 

What I loved about the romance between Diana and Steve was that it was gradual and based on a stable sense of friendship before it transformed into something deeper. Even more importantly, it was presented in such a pure way. Sure, both Diana and Steve have a number of disagreements and challenge each others beliefs, but never once did I doubt they truly cared for each other. This is the kind of love story that fairy tales should be made of.

5. The Action 

From beginning to end, the fight scenes were beautifully choreographed and executed in way that was visually satisfying. I loved how the Amazons’ fighting style was a mixture of fantastically inhuman moves (such as high flips in the air or soaring off clifftops to shoot bows) and gritty combating techniques. Aside from basically every scene involving the Amazons, some of my other favorite action sequences included the scene where Diana saves Steve in the alley with her bullet-deflecting bracers and her awe-inducing race across the trenches of “No Man’s Land”.

6. The Sets 

As I said before, the architecture and scenery of Themyscira was visual eye candy at its finest. The Amazons’ armor was a perfect mixture of historical and fantastical attire, and in the process, Wonder Woman’s iconic outfit received a perfect upgrade. However, I also liked the stark contrast between the natural environment of the island filled with greenery and clear blue water and the industrial gray of London and the trenches.

7. Wonder Woman 

Lastly, but most importantly, the best part of this film is the development of Wonder Woman herself. Patty Jenkins did an outstanding job in incorporating a level of artfulness and ingenuity in her storytelling that many of the latest superhero movies have been drastically lacking.  As someone who has never read the comics and knew basically nothing about this iconic character beforehand, by the close of the story I had a full understanding of who Wonder Woman was and how she became this way. Even more importantly, I wanted more. More action. More storytelling. And definitely more Wonder Woman.


For those of you who have seen the movie, what were your thoughts?

Nature’s first green is gold…

img_9618

“Nature’s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.”

―Robert Frost, “Nothing Gold Can Stay”

My Musings: Magic Binds by Ilona Andrews

img_9577

The latest addition to the Kate Daniels’ series has everything that’s great about the series: suspense, humor, great fight scenes, and, of course, quality Kate and Curran time. Yet despite all of this, for some reason, this installment didn’t hold my attention as much as the previous ones. In short, I was able to put it down. For a while. Honestly, when I try to remember the basic plot I can recall a blur. To me, I guess, this book felt like a fill-in volume. Yes, Kate, seemingly out of nowhere can now hold her own against her father’s invincible power, but *spoiler* he still hasn’t been defeated by the end. Towards the middle, the pace was beginning to pick up and pieces were falling into place for an awesome battle scene at the end—which turned out to be way shorter than I expected, not mention drastically anticlimactic. Don’t get me wrong. Like I stated before, this book is still very much a part of the Kate Daniels’ series with the same charm as all the previous novels, and when I finally got into it, I couldn’t put it down. Still, something about it just seemed off to me. Maybe it was the short length or lack of substantial plot, I don’t know. With that being said, I’m still a fan of this series, and I will definitely be reading the next volume.

📚✔︎ Would recommend for fans of urban fantasy with action and romance

If I could summarize the book in three words: entertaining, but forgettable 

Check out the official summary of Magic Binds by Ilona Andrews on goodreads.

My rating (out of 5 stars): ★★★★

 

Given the all the raw emotions remaining from the election last night, I thought today would be a good day to share this quote with everyone.

tumblr_ofti34nJd71ubg0oto1_540.jpg

Even darkness must pass. 

A new day will come. 

And when the sun shines 

it will shine out the clearer. 

-J.R.R. Tolkien 

Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life’s coming attractions. -Albert Einstein

IMG_9553.JPG

Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life’s coming attractions. 

-Albert Einstein 

“The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words all being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” -Vladimir Nabokov

tumblr_ofti1bvz441ubg0oto1_540.jpg

“The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words all being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.”

-Vladimir Nabokov

Music Playlist Part III: Battle/Action Scenes

img_9535

In this part, I will be posting some of my favorite instrumental tracks to listen to while I’m writing action or battle scenes. The majority of these following songs consists of film scores and trailer music. I hope you enjoy!

  1. Phoenix Rising-Audiomachine
  2. Red Warrior-Audiomachine
  3. Archangel-Two Steps From Hell
  4. Praetorian Guards-Jo Blankenburg
  5. Guardians at the Gate-Audiomachine
  6. Legions of Doom-Audiomachine
  7. The Battle-Harry Gregson-Williams
  8. Firebending Training-Jeremy Zuckerman
  9. Black Blade-Two Steps From Hell
  10. Blood and Stone-Audiomachine
  11. Legacy-Fringe Element
  12. Drink Up Me Hearties Yo Ho-Hans Zimmer
  13. Dracarys-Ramin Djawadi
  14. Taking a Stand-Henry Jackman
  15. Finale and Curtain Call-Joe Kraemer
  16. The Majestic Tale (Of a Madman in a Box)-Murray Gold 

tumblr_oesj8e5of81ubg0oto1_1280

The Query Letter and Purpose of a Literary Agent

Hello, everyone! I just sent out my first batch of query letters to several literary agents (*crosses fingers excitedly*), so for this post I thought I would focus on the subject of literary agents in general. I hope all you aspiring authors looking to get published out there find this helpful!

Anyone trying to get his or her manuscript published should strongly consider looking into obtaining agent. Their job is to submit the author’s work to publishing houses, or more specifically, the editors he or she believes would be the best match for the manuscript. In essence, literary agents act as mediators between the author and any entity wishing to sell, advertise, or promote his or her work, such as publishers or film studios. Simply stated, a literary agent’s function is to act as the author’s representative in the literary market. An agent will drastically increase your chances of getting your manuscript accepted by editors, negotiate the terms of your publishing contacts to give you the best deal possible, and also manage the subrights of your work.

Author Nathan Bransford has written a wonderful article that depicts the author-literary agent partnership in great detail here.

Here’s a basic list of the things you should include in your query letter:

  • 1-2 paragraph summary of your manuscript (like the blurbs on the back of book covers you see at the store) 
  • Brief biography (only things writing-related) 
  • Word count of your manuscript 
  • Why you are contacting this particular agent (note: This is IMPORTANT in making your query letter more personalized. If you’re choosing to query a specific agent because you read an interview that he or she was looking for YA fantasy works, and your manuscript fits this description then MENTION this!) 

Before starting your letter, you should research various resources online for more detailed guidelines on how to do this (the link for AgentQuery below will lead you to a page with this kind of information).

Okay, so now you maybe wondering exactly how to find the right literary agent for you?

One of the easiest ways to do this is to search online. There are many writing websites that regularly post agent spotlights that explain the types of manuscripts each one is looking for. These are some of my favorites:

AgentQuery

Literary Rambles

Manuscript Wishlist

You can also buy this year’s Guide to Literary Agents book, which contains a comprehensive list of every literary agency in the U.S. and what genres they are currently accepting.

Tip: While it is tempting to immediately send a query letter to the top literary agents of famous bestsellers, you should keep in mind that newer agents who are still building their client lists are more open to submissions and more likely to take on inexperienced authors. Writer’s Digest has a specific segment focusing on new and upcoming agents that you can check out here.

Good luck and write on!

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑